Eat like a winter locavore, the Food & Wine way

foodandwine.jpgFood and Wine Magazine has an article in the February 2007 issue about eating like a locavore, featuring several locavorean recipes. It's great to see a mainstream food magazine like this one highlighting something like eating locally, which takes into account more than just how an ingredient tastes.

The article discusses varying degrees of locavoreanism, ranging from the 100-mile diet folks; to what F&W calls "Marco Polo rules," which include spices that sailors could have carried; to people like the Butter Bitch and me who drink coffee and eat chocolate.

I asked the Butter Bitch if she would give up coffee on principle, and she retorted, "What principle would make me give up coffee?" We do have our limits. I like my coffee, too.

The article features recipes from two cooks, a Berkeley food buyer and a Vermont chef. Initially, I was dubious about the Vermont recipes, which include red wine, but I realized that my own basement contains a few wines from distant Oregon, and I have salt and pepper that certainly aren't local.

Of the two regions, I find Vermont to be more interesting as an example, since they share cold weather and a northern climate with Washington State - although Vermont typically gets more snow than those of us in Puget Sound.

I like that the recipes highlight local specialties, such as the artisan ciders of Vermont and lesser known wine regions such as California's Livermore Valley. The red wine and lamb shanks recipe is especially appealing, since we have both on hand already. I had planned to make the lamb last weekend - instead, I put the finishing touches on a couple of new recipes.

Still, using California as an example of locavoreanism seems like cheating, since there are so many products to be found. More interesting regions would have been Texas or Washington State.

I said as much to Catherine, the Food and Wine person who sent us the link to the article. To my surprise, she said she would be interested in our recipes and asked me to send some her way. Which I have, by email last night.

The recipes represent only Washington State - our Texas-based Omniwhore is busy with other commitments at the moment. I'm hoping that Food and Wine will publish the recipes in some format, but if they don't you'll see them here.

2 Responsesto “Eat like a winter locavore, the Food & Wine way”

  1. kevin says:

    "Still, using California as an example of locavoreanism seems like cheating, since there are so many products to be found. More interesting regions would have been Texas or Washington State."

    Nonsense. Both have mild climates. Nothing interesting there. Try eating locally year-round in a place like New Hampshire or Minnesota.

  2. Man of La Muncha says:

    Idaho and Alaska also would pose interesting challenges.

    California's Bay Area is situated in a more temperate zone than Puget Sound, where snow is common in January and February, and fresh vegetables other than root vegetables are uncommon.

    The mention of Washington and Texas were obvious - or so I thought - references to our correspondents here in Washington and afar in Texas.

    Eating locally in the Midwest, or New England, or most of Canada, Northern Europe and other places would make for very interesting reading.

    However, your comment gives me an idea. Stay tuned.