Digest – Features: Harkin in harness, bittersweet symphonies, kid-food no-no’s

starSitting in the kiddie chair: How would-be Farm Bill reformer Senator Tom Harkin, Democrat of Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, has been thwarted by members of his own committee, all of whom represent farm states. New York Times) Comment: CFRA’s Dan Owens, who appears to have spent the day blogging the Farm Bill mark-up in real time via C-Span, takes outraged issue with the committee members’ defense that they were just "protecting the farmers they represent."

Holy Cacao: The current issue of the New Yorker features Bill Buford writing about entrepreneur Frederick Schilling, of Dagoba Chocolates, and the rise of artisanal chocolate. The article’s not online, but this cool slideshow is.

Or, you could just eat sugar: Wholesome Sweeteners’ Organic Zero, a new low-calorie organic artificial sweetener, has hit the market. Too bad sugar cookies made with it "came out tasting more like corn muffin tops." (San Francisco Chronicle)

Sigh. Just sigh.: A small but growing number of Minnesota schools are offering organic foods to answer parents’ calls for healthier options. Too bad the examples listed of those foods are organic chocolate milk, "yogurt in a tube," and granola bars. (Pioneer Press)

Don’t lie to your kids about food: Who cares whether Jessica (Mrs. Jerry) Seinfeld plagiarized recipes from a similar cookbook by Missy Chase Lapine, asks Mimi Sheraton. Both of their messages are terribly wrong. (Slate Magazine)

And from the meat department — we’ll spare you five beef puns in a row:

  • Salon takes a rational look at PETA’s argument that meat is the No. 1 cause of global warming. Interesting twist: Eating chicken is "better," planet-wise, than eggs and dairy. Meanwhile, Slate’s new Green Lantern column covers the same ground.
  • As grass-fed beef becomes more popular again, its producers should practice rotational grazing, not rangeland grazing, which is devastating to our limited water and natural resources. (New West Network)
  • Northern Ireland’s red meat industry is losing £200 million per year. Why aren’t they all following this one young farmer’s footsteps into organic beef? (BBC News)
  • Visiting a small-scale organic commercial piggery as a jumping off point for Australia’s nascent movement rejecting industrial agriculture. (The Age)
  • Looking back at the ways that Atlantic contributors have followed the meat industry. (The Atlantic)

2 Responsesto “Digest – Features: Harkin in harness, bittersweet symphonies, kid-food no-no’s”

  1. ExPat Chef says:

    Amen to the “Deceptively Delicious” approach. I think anyone here can attest that we’ve had enough deception with regard to food, and are not about to use it as a parenting tool.

  2. Jack says:

    “Northern Ireland’s red meat industry is losing £200 million per year. Why aren’t they all following this one young farmer’s footsteps into organicBeef?”

    Perhaps because so few care about organic beef in that small part of the world.