Supercool maps of organic hotspots vs. all farming in the US

Step up, Florida: The Times has an attention-grabbing series of U.S. maps comparing the clustering of organic farms with the locations of all farm operations across the country. It won't surprise anyone that the bulk of organic farms are concentrated on the West Coast, in the Northeast, and around the Great Lakes. The clusters match up well with the clusters of other farms in general, but we noticed one glaring exception: Florida, which has lots of orchards and some vegetable farms (such as worker-abusing tomato ones), but very few organic farms. Some sobering or exciting stats, depending on whether you're an optimist or pessimist: organic vegetables now account for 5% of all vegetable sales, and organic dairies (the fastest-growing sector) now produce 1% of U.S. milk. (New York Times)

3 Responsesto “Supercool maps of organic hotspots vs. all farming in the US”

  1. garth says:

    It's interesting that the map is limited only to Certified Organic farms which do not, of course, constitute the entirety of SOLE/hippie-raised/what-have-you agriculture. The map at <a href="http://www.localharvest.org/">Local Harvest</a> shows a much more uniform distribution of farms nationwide.

    Whether an Earthbound Farms is equivilent to the uncertified and self-proclaimed "beyond organic" <a href="http://www.seabreezefarm.net/philosophy.html">Sea Breeze Farm</a> is certainly debatable.

  2. Eric Reuter says:

    That map is a good illustration of many of the reasons we chose to settle and farm in Missouri as opposed to New England or the Upper Midwest. Wide open opportunities for small farmers.

  3. RanchWabble says:

    Interesting article.  Living in Michigan we see a lot of organic farms being represented at the farmers markets.  Many of my friends that have organic farms attend the markets in Chicago where they make a killing on berry sales, because of the amount of money people are willing to pay for fresh organic grown produce.  I have even noticed some people buying in bulk from farms and then reselling in the Chicago markets ... which is not allowed, but some people just get away with things I guess.