Currently Browsing: GMOs

Digest – News: Pharm goats OK’d, farm profits dwindle, and peanuts throw dirt on the FDA

Brave new world: FDA approves the first pharm-animal drug, a blood thinner made from the milk of bioengineered goats. Critics nail FDA for its shoddy approval process and worry about what could happen if the animals escape from the lab and mate with unsuspecting non-GM cohorts. (NYT) Slow like honey, sticky...

Digest – News: Focusing the foodies, DNA Q&A, and MRSA attacks

Good food movement needs focus: The Post's Jane Black reports on a series of pricey charity dinners in Washington, DC organized by Berkeley foodies in honor of the inauguration. Their goal was to propel food-system change into the agenda of the new administration, but some say the movement is too fragmented...

Digest – Features and blogs: COOL is not, GM fuel, and DC local-style

So un-COOL: The USDA releases the final rule on Country of Origin Labeling, the law that requires that many of our main foodstuffs be labeled with (duh) the country where they were made, but it leaves a massive loophole by exempting "processed" foods from the law and defining "processed" broadly to include...

Biotech & Big Pharma rolling out exciting new holiday products

By Barry Foy When it comes to Christmas cheer, St. Nick has nothing on the big biotech and pharmaceutical firms this year, with the release of an unprecedented number of holiday-related products expected over the next few weeks. Given the sector's legendary lack of sentimentality, this nod toward tradition...

Digest – Features & Blogs: Obama and GMOs, O’Brien interviewed, Chuck E. Cheesiness

GMObama?: Tom Philpott takes a look at the state of U.S. regulation of genetically modified food — basically, we don't, and evidence indicate we should — and asks whether Obama will "update a broken regulatory framework that hasn't been changed since its birth in the, gulp, Quayle era?" Chances not looking...

Digest: Toxic whales, piles of poop, and a brightening future for GM crops

Leaving resistance to the weeds?: In response to surging food prices and population growth, Brazil, the EU, and other regions that haven't allowed the cultivation of herbicide-tolerant and other GM crops are loosening their restrictions, crossing their fingers, and hoping for a second Green Revolution. (AP...

Digest: Pass the potatoes, hold the pesticides, and Bittman takes a bite (of sardines)

Salmon dieu!: On Wednesday, the National Organic Standards Board will rule on whether any fish can be labeled organic. Under the guidelines as proposed, wild salmon will not make the grade but farm-raised salmon could, even if they eat fish meal, which is feed spiked with ground-up wild fish. (Chicago...

Digest: A schizophrenic FDA, processed-meat worries, and survey says we want good food

The Digest is back! Several months ago, our weekly food-politics news digest went on hiatus. Maybe you missed it, maybe not; we did. So starting today, we'll do our very darndest to bring you regular roundups of the most Ethicurean-relevant news items. Got a tip? Send it to new Digest editor Elanor via...

Florida citrus crops attacked by bacterium, future in peril

These days, everywhere you look, a new industry or service is marketed as "greening" itself — making it more environmentally conscious by reducing its carbon footprint or assuaging its corporate guilt through any number of steps. Usually that's considered a good thing. But an article in this week's New York...

Defender of the seeds: Q&A with Claire Hope Cummings, author of “Uncertain Peril”

An environmental lawyer for 20 years, including four spent with the USDA, Claire Hope Cummings reports regularly on agriculture and the environment; she has also farmed in California and in Vietnam. We chatted recently about her new book, Uncertain Peril: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Seeds, for the...

Mini-Digest: Monsanto wants to “save” the world, Kill Bill Vol. 247, SOLE research in the pipeline

You say crisis, we say …Croesus: Monsanto has launched a massive PR campaign (New York Times) promising to double the yields of corn, soy, and cotton using genetically modified seeds. Never mind that its most successful GM seed to date has produced lower yields while requiring higher inputs and actually...

“Climate-ready” seeds: Every cloud has a golden lining for these profiteers

Claire Hope Cummings is the author of the new book "Uncertain Peril: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Seeds." An environmental lawyer for 20 years, including four spent with the USDA, Cummings reports regularly on agriculture and the environment for national media outlets; she has also farmed in...

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