Currently Browsing: Books

Beer me: Trolling for craft brews in an ocean of Bud

Out of fairness, I should begin this post by admitting that I do not actually like beer. Never a big drinker, when the urge hits, my tastes veer toward wine and, OK, a nip of whiskey. But just as I appreciate (and, in fact, spend my professional life studying) livestock production despite being a...

Well worth the wheat: Gene Logsdon’s “Small-Scale Grain Raising”

As the price of flour and other grain-based foods has risen, creative-minded people have begun to consider growing their own wheat, corn, rye, and other grains. Groovy Green noted last year that one bakery — the Hungry Ghost Bread company in Northhampton, Massachusetts — even offered grain seeds to their...

Mark Bittman on Cooking Up a Story

Mark Bittman, whose "How to Cook Everything: 2,000 Simple Recipes for Great Food" is the best present you can give a young wannabe cook — I still turn to my decrepit copy weekly for simple, delicious, reliable recipes — has become quite vocal in the past year or so about how important it is to chew the...

Outta space?: R. J. Ruppenthal’s “Fresh Food From Small Spaces”

Though I've been lucky to "borrow" my friends' back yard for a garden this year, during the winter I still crave growing something green and edible. But in an apartment with insufficient amounts of direct sunlight, I sometimes find it difficult to grow much of anything. I know I'm not alone in having that...

Digest – Blogs: Fast food (no)ledge, eater of the year, and a holiday book roundup

Can we still eat that burger with our heads in the sand?: Several states have passed industry-driven legislation tying the hands of local authorities to require fast food outlets to post nutrition information on restaurant menu boards. (NowPublic; thanks, Jack!) Raw milk? FDA insists "Drink Local": The FDA...

Grass act: Gene Logsdon’s “All Flesh Is Grass”

As the problems of industrial meat production — CAFOs, excessive waste and pollution, worker safety, and the overuse of antibiotics, among many others — become more evident and more dangerous to public health, consumers are turning in greater numbers to local and/or organic meats and poultry, especially...

Celebrating food independence: A review of “Depletion and Abundance”

OK, quick check: everyone who is concerned about the economic crisis turning into a depression and causing food and fuel prices to rise and pockets to empty — whether for yourself, your parents, your children, your neighbors, your friends, or anyone — raise your hand. That covers about everyone, doesn't...

The ‘Eat This, Not That’ guy compares his book to Obama, offers crappy advice for families

Oh my stars. David Zinczenko has gone insane. A while ago, I reviewed Zinczenko's book "Eat This! Not That!" which is selling like hotcakes, even if it's not making our nation any healthier. I was content to let it go at that. But friends? Zinczenko has gone batty. He may be the editor of Men's Health...

“Eat This! Not That!” presents the solution to the wrong problem

“Get yourself a copy of ‘Eat This, Not That,’" someone told me recently. “It’s flying off the bookstore shelves.” I did pick up a copy. And I’m confused. Written by David Zinczenko, the editor-in-chief of “Men’s Health” magazine, "Eat This, Not That” is highly accessible and fun to read. The premise is...

Defender of the seeds: Q&A with Claire Hope Cummings, author of “Uncertain Peril”

An environmental lawyer for 20 years, including four spent with the USDA, Claire Hope Cummings reports regularly on agriculture and the environment; she has also farmed in California and in Vietnam. We chatted recently about her new book, Uncertain Peril: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Seeds, for the...

I can read you like a cook: A review of “Kitchen Literacy”

As the local-food movement broadens and more people find pleasure in shopping at the local farmers markets and/or in growing their own produce, we find more folks 'fessing up to their lack of expertise. How do you know when a fruit or vegetable is ripe? What's the difference between various cuts of meat?...

Review: Carolyn Steel’s “Hungry City”

A review I wrote of "Hungry City: How Food Shapes Our Lives," a new UK food-politics book by architecture professor Carolyn Steel, appeared in the Financial Times' weekend supplement yesterday. There's a lot in the last chapter of the book that bears discussing here, including vertical farms and how...

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