Currently Browsing: Community

Slow but steady growth: Building the Local Roots market in Ohio

This summer has been a cool one so far here in northeastern Ohio. The sweltering heat and humidity has so far failed to materialize, and while I personally am not complaining about being less uncomfortable, I do sometimes worry about the gardens. The mild days and cool nights are keeping tomatoes from...

Food safety vs. sustainable agriculture in a scorched-earth battle

Farms are not factories: The always-good Carolyn Lochhead reports on the invisible-to-the-public price that produce farmers — and their farms — are being forced to pay in the name of food safety. "In the verdant farmland surrounding Monterey Bay, a national marine sanctuary and one of the world's biological...

Urban homesteading in Oakland

Community supported appetites: Fun profile of the Bay Area's food-movement power couple, Anya Fernald (former director of CAFF and the woman who pulled off nothing short of a miracle at Slow Food Nation) and Renato Sardo (former head of Slow Food International, now food retailing mastermind). They've turned...

Ripe time, ripe place: In England, a groundswell of food growers outstrips supply of land

My piece about allotment gardening in the United Kingdom has just been published in the Washington Post food section. If you're not familiar with allotments, they're the English version of America's community gardens, only the plots are much, much bigger (averaging 2,700 square feet), and they have long...

Local Roots update: Market plans proceeding in Wooster, OH

Farmers market season is just weeks away here in northeastern Ohio, and local growers have worked long days to get their crops planted after a slow start to spring. Behind the scenes at Local Roots, the we've put in long hours, too, planting our own seeds for a year-round farmers market in Wooster. We've...

What two 19th-century cities can teach us about community-based food systems

While compiling this week's (long overdue) Digest, I came across the excellent infographic above in Yes! magazine's April issue, which is all about growing a food revolution. It nicely collects all of the inputs — homegrown seed, clean energy, regional processing plants, grow-your-own programs — that...

Happy Easter! Celebrate spring with an apple-and-onion tart

Easter is a big deal where I grew up in the Midwest, at least in the circles my family traveled in. Sunday church service, where we sang "The Old Rugged Cross," Easter dresses and hats, pastel ties, egg hunts, and plastic grass were all part of the revelry. Perhaps the most memorable part of all of it was...

On your market, get set…: Building Local Roots in Ohio

There must be something in the Ethicurean (tap) waters.  As much as we love to eat and write about SOLE food, more and more of us are finding ways to put not just our money, but our time and energy, where our mouths are. From our die-hard community gardeners Peter and Elanor to our CSA-pork-packin' mama...

A recent California transplant builds a garden with help from fellow zero-wasters & frugalistas

By Stephanie Paige Ogburn As the general economic malaise coincides with impending spring fever, recession gardening has come into vogue. Stories of record-high seed sales pepper the news, along with musings about modern-day Victory Gardens saving people money on produce sales. I’ve been gardening — most...

After Michelle Obama: a Q&A with Scott Schenkelberg of Miriam’s Kitchen

Mrs. Obama on the line at Miriam's Kitchen; photo courtesy of Choice Photography. Last week, Michelle Obama made news by serving a meal at Miriam’s Kitchen, a DC social service agency. Miriam’s Kitchen feeds 4,000 people each year, mostly from fresh, wholesome ingredients. I caught up with the executive...

Rooted in discomfort: Dispatch from the MOSES organic farming conference

Lately I’ve realized that in the midst of distracting sights and sounds, I forget to notice the smells around me. So last weekend at the Organic Farming Conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin, I made an effort to pay attention. Surrounded by friends new and old, I smelled hay, dirt, manure, beer, sweat and...

Serving meals, shedding anger, at a free lunch program in New England

Toward the end of last year, something happened. I still can’t say what, exactly, I just know it happened almost overnight. For two years, I’d been reading and blogging almost exclusively about food. I’d devoured articles about CAFOs and corn, downer cows and diabetes, subsidies and school lunches. I’d sat...

« Older Entries Next Entries »