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West Michigan’s small-scale alternative food systems — and the future of such endeavors

Even though Grand Rapids is a mid-size city, it does have a small-town feel — once you’ve been here a while you start to realize everybody pretty much knows everybody else. When I first moved here and asked people who I should talk to about the food system, I heard two names over and over: Tom Cary and Gail...

Rock bottom of the food chain: Children in the fields

Prepare yourself for Food and Society Conference overload — Elanor and I are here in Chandler, AZ, at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's annual food-movement meeting and thanks to an angel named Nicole de Beaufort, there is practically an army of bloggers this time. Basically, I'm hanging out with half our blog...

A capital creamery: DC’s Dolcezza spins local flavors into artisanal gelato

Please welcome guest contributor and frequent Ethicurean commenter Emily Horton. Emily writes about food, culture and sustainability issues in Washington, D.C., where she's lived since last September. Before that, she lived in Atlanta and Chapel Hill, N.C., where she lost her accent for the first time and...

Announcing the Bay Area’s newest meat CSA: the Clark Summit Farm Meat Club!

In September 2006 I complained to then-San Francisco Chronicle reporter Carol Ness that there were plenty of veggie Community Supported Agriculture programs in the Bay Area, but none that would give you a selection of chicken, beef, pork, and eggs every month. She quoted me as saying I thought someone...

Meeting my meat at Garden of Eden/Lionette’s Market in Boston

Johanna Kolodny is dedicated to working to change the food system at multiple levels. She has worked with the NYC Greenmarket and Slow Food, and taught undergraduate courses about the food system. A graduate of Williams College, she received her MA in Food Studies from New York University. On a frigid...

Sometimes you just have to go for a walk

How do I know I've been neglecting the Ethicurean? My mother sent me an email yesterday titled "Now I'm Worried" — not because I hadn't replied to her last three messages, but because I hadn't posted on the blog in ages. Since a few other people have wondered whether I've fallen under a bus, or been...

Please welcome Ali, and check out the Ethicurean on Facebook

We're very pleased to announce that guest contributor Ali Benjamin has accepted our invitation to don an Ethicurean apron. Ali's a busy bee on the Internets, writing her own blog, The Cleaner Plate Club, as well as contributing to Eat. Drink. Better. She's a freelance writer and mom in Vermont; for more,...

Severine and “The Greenhorns”: Sowing the seeds of revolution

Have you ever encountered an idealistic young person with such presence that you thought, Whoa — this one might actually succeed in changing the world!? That's the way I felt, anyway, on meeting Severine von Tscharner Fleming a few years ago, back when I was working for UC Berkeley and she was a...

An “Unsettling” look at industrial agriculture

The flaws of industrial agriculture and the current backlash against it came into sharp focus a couple of weeks ago, following the death of former Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, well-known for his exhortations to farmers to "Get big or get out" and to plant from "fence row to fence row." Between the...

Digest – Announcements: Community food case studies wanted, water video contest

We're starting to get more requests from researchers, nonprofits, and others to publicize various things. Our personpower is limited, so we've decide to publish a regular roundup of surveys, contests, etc. Submit yours to digest at thissite.com for consideration. Flying the co-op: The Wallace Center and the...

The Eat Well Guide v2.0: Finding SOLE food on the road

Bonnie P.: One of the things I have enjoyed most about starting this blog is the number of people it has brought me into contact with who are passionate about finding, supporting, and popularizing SOLE food. Here at the Ethicurean, we're trying to create an online hub for that community in various ways...

Winter on a New Hampshire farm

There are some parts of the country where, between late November and sometime around February, you just can't get anything to grow. Call it a lumen lack. During those bleak months, the sun's weak, pasty arms don't reach far enough up into the northern latitudes to get the plants the juice they need. I hail...

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