Currently Browsing: Cooking

The Edible Schoolyard brings learning to life

The cover story of this week's East Bay Express has a provocative teaser: "Berkeley's Edible Schoolyard teaches students how their food is produced and prepared. Is this overdue innovation or a distraction for kids who should be learning math?" So part of me was expecting a thrashing like the one delivered...

‘Revolution’ off to contentious and hopeful start

The ABC preview of "Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution” Sunday night has me modestly hopeful that ordinary Americans — those largely untouched by the movement to improve diet and agriculture — might watch and learn. “Revolution” puts reality TV’s conflict-based formula to work by sending celebrity chef Oliver...

The pie’s the limit! Get baking for Pi Day, March 14

Back in my (much) younger days, I used to enjoy math class. I especially got a kick out of geometry and the formulas used to calculate area, perimeter or circumference, and volume. My mother and I used to have fun with one formula in particular: "What's the formula for the area of a circle?" she would ask....

Souped-up meals to warm up snow days

Every time I've looked out the window this week, I've felt a childlike glee at the sight of all the snow piled up. A whopping 18" dropped in 24 hours last weekend, a few more inches covered that earlier this week, and more is in the forecast. I really sympathize with the folks further south (south!) who...

Food as performance sport

Iron stomachs: True/Slant Matthew Greenberg takes on the Food Network again, exploring — with the help of media experts — "why food TV is more and more about how to eat 48 ounces of steak rather than how to cook it." In a related post on the same site, Susan Toepfer notes that "more and more, we seem to be...

Apple days are here again

As the weather turns colder here in northeast Ohio, harvests are tapering off and farmers markets are dwindling, both on the farmer side and the shopper side. We're approaching that time of year when the only local produce you can expect to find for months consists of potatoes, onions, cabbage, and squash....

Preserving the seasons through fermentation

The new culture of culturing: One of the hot topics in the Bay Area food community is fermentation — using friendly bacteria to turn fruits and vegetables into sauerkraut, kimchi and other piquant preserves. Tara Duggan gives an extensive overview of this new culture, one that is spawning home-picklers,...

Sardinistas! Love the little fish with the big impact

Falling hard for pilchards: Jane Black gives some attention to the sardine, a much maligned fish these days. Sardines are a relatively good choice for many reasons — they are high in Omega 3's, low in mercury and PCBs, they reproduce relatively quickly, and the California sardine fishery is currently well...

Processed food companies: Food safety is the consumer’s job

Perhaps the only time we'll agree with Michael Osterholm: Mega food companies like ConAgra, whose frozen chicken pot pies sickened over 15,000 people two years ago, are giving up the ghost and admitting they have no idea where many of their ingredients come from nor how they've been handled. Sound like a...

Freeze! Avoid food waste and save time with these savvy tips

Cold shouldering: Here at cash-strapped Ethicurean headquarters, we've been mining our freezer for meals for the past few weeks. James Beard awardwinner Mark Bittman tells how to use the big old appliance more efficiently, to freeze raw ingredients you have too much of — or whose life you simply wish to...

Make or buy: Pantry staples from scratch

She forgot pancakes: Jennifer Reese tests her intuition and runs a cost-benefit analysis on how much she'd save by making from scratch six everyday foods. (Slate Magazine) We're surprised the cream cheese was a failure, frankly, and must test it ourselves post...

Happy Easter! Celebrate spring with an apple-and-onion tart

Easter is a big deal where I grew up in the Midwest, at least in the circles my family traveled in. Sunday church service, where we sang "The Old Rugged Cross," Easter dresses and hats, pastel ties, egg hunts, and plastic grass were all part of the revelry. Perhaps the most memorable part of all of it was...

« Older Entries Next Entries »