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After Michelle Obama: a Q&A with Scott Schenkelberg of Miriam’s Kitchen

Mrs. Obama on the line at Miriam's Kitchen; photo courtesy of Choice Photography. Last week, Michelle Obama made news by serving a meal at Miriam’s Kitchen, a DC social service agency. Miriam’s Kitchen feeds 4,000 people each year, mostly from fresh, wholesome ingredients. I caught up with the executive...

Review: Real Food For Healthy Kids cookbook

I talk a lot of smack about sustainable food. About the unexpected pleasures of farmer’s markets, about voting with one’s fork, about "local economies" this and "food miles" that. But here’s my dirty little secret: it wasn’t that long ago that I fed my daughter a steady diet of chicken nuggets, mac and...

Learning to share: “Dinner at Your Door,” by Alex Davis, Diana Ellis, and Andy Remeis

Not quite two years ago, as our local meat CSA was in the works, I gathered with a few people to discuss “The Omnivore's Dilemma,” the Ethicurean, CSAs, and local food in general. One person turned to me and asked how they could make time for the shopping and cooking required to get away from the fast-food,...

Loafing in a cold climate

Winter weather has provided us with a never-ending topic of conversation lately: the storms pummeling the upper Midwest, the guesses as to how much those storms might repeat themselves here in northern Ohio, how to arrange our travels in the face of weather advisories, and, eventually, how much snow we...

Political celebrations past and present

On election night in 1992* — the year that Bill Clinton won his first term and Barbara Boxer was first elected to the Senate — I made the flag-adorned chocolate truffles pictured above as part of a celebratory dinner. If I remember correctly, they tasted much better than they looked, made even better by the...

Mark Bittman on Cooking Up a Story

Mark Bittman, whose "How to Cook Everything: 2,000 Simple Recipes for Great Food" is the best present you can give a young wannabe cook — I still turn to my decrepit copy weekly for simple, delicious, reliable recipes — has become quite vocal in the past year or so about how important it is to chew the...

Making sausages

Whoever first made sausages was a genius. They took pieces of meat that they perhaps weren't going to use right away, or at all, and combined them with spices and/or herbs, finally stuffing them into another part of the animal that might not otherwise get used. The result? Delicious. After thinking about...

Making Thyme combines fast with food — but real food, not foodlike substances

Editor's note: Please welcome our newest addition to the Ethicurean "team," Stephanie Pierce, who's written for us quite a lot as a guest contributor. A native of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Stephanie will soon be moving from Grand Rapids, MI, to begin a yearlong kitchen/garden internship at the...

Report from TASTE3: Peter Reinhart on life and death in breadmaking

At the TASTE3 conference in Napa, instructor and author Peter Reinhart told a fascinating life-and-death tale about breadmaking. Although a baker with Reinhart's years of experience might have some tales of Lethal Weapon-style escapes from exploding flour mills or daring bread-delivery runs through a...

The eat is on: A virtual Victory Garden potluck

If you've strolled through your local farmers market lately, you've noticed that for most of us around the continent, we're seeing the peak of harvest season. Farmers pile their tables high with intensely red tomatoes, brilliantly hued hot peppers, earthy potatoes, luscious fruits of multiple varieties, and...

Anything zuke can do…

Every summer I look forward to each crop coming into its own, and I dream about all the wonderful dishes I'll cook or the preserves I'll make for winter. I'm even learning to appreciate some produce that gets less love than the usual tomatoes and beans and corn: every July, for example, I crave okra and...

Weed’em and reap

Now that our Victory Gardens are starting to burst with the fruits (and vegetables) of our labors, those of us who have just recovered from the physical exhaustion of planting the crops find there's "no rest for the wicked" — or at least not in regard to weeding. In between rows, interspersed with seedlings...

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