Currently Browsing: Fish

The water wars: California’s salmon vs. agribiz interests

By Paul Johnson I've been selling fish for 30 years, and I'm pleased that my store, the Monterey Fish Market, has a reputation for exceptionally fresh and sustainably sourced seafood. We're lucky in that our customers support us in our mission to provide the best possible product that doesn't contribute to...

Here’s the catch: More sustainable seafood requires exerting pressure up the supply chain

This is part 2 of a series on improving market-based seafood sustainability initiatives, inspired by a recent article published by an international team of researchers in "Oryx: The International Journal of Conservation." (See Oryx volume 44, pp. 45-56 doi:10.1017/S0030605309990470. Summaries available from...

Why seafood wallet cards can be the wrong bait for consumers

Seafood guides and other consumer-based campaigns are an important part of the quest for sustainable seafood and healthy oceans, but so far they have not shown enough positive results: bigger efforts are needed. That’s the main conclusion of a new article, "Conserving wild fish in a sea of market-based...

Food & Wine magazine sins against the monkfish

In the January 2010 issue of Food & Wine magazine, former New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni visits top-rated Le Bernardin (3 stars from Michelin, 4 stars from the New York Times) and acts like an ass to the sommelier as he eats his multicourse meal*. If you're into restaurant drama, or food...

Tuna or not-tuna: more questions for sushi eaters

When you think about eating endangered species, you might imagine going to Chinatown to some secret restaurant — or to the ones operated by shadowy mobsters like in the 1990 comedy "The Freshman," with Matthew Broderick and Marlon Brando. But if you order tuna in your neighborhood sushi restaurant, you too...

The little fish that we can: California’s sardine industry, now and then

When the subject of Monterey, California, comes up, most people think of two things: the magnificent scenery and the peerless aquarium. I think of a third: sardines. Two days after Thanksgiving, I took a day trip to Monterey to see the dramatic coastline and experience some of city's connection with...

There Be Dragons: Examining the alternatives to unsustainable aquaculture fish feed

February 23, 2010 update: I discovered that the credit for the grasshopper photo was incorrect. The photo is actually from tazintosh's Flickr collection and the photo's Flickr page is here. My apologies to the photographer, who has a great collection of photos in his Flickr collection, including many other...

Scientists monitor tuna by measuring toxins

Toxins tell tuna's tale:  The Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) population is split into two groups, with the 45 degree meridian acting as a rough dividing line. Some fish swim across the line to feed or spawn, and scientists and fishery managers would like to know how many fish make the ocean...

New research on aquaculture industry reveals murky waters surrounding fish-feed issue

The products of aquaculture, the farming of sea creatures and plants, are often divided into "bad fish" — piscavores, like salmon, that eat more pounds of protein in the form of other fish than they yield — and "good fish," omnivores like tilapia and carp that can survive on plant matter. A new paper from...

Scientists gain understanding of mercury transport in the Pacific Ocean

Mercury goes with the flow: Pacific-caught tuna is one of the major sources of mercury in the U.S. diet, and so scientists are trying to understand how tuna pick up mercury. Mercury levels in the eastern North Pacific (where a significant fraction of albacore tuna are caught) have been rising recently, even...

Why catch-shares and ITQs will not solve overfishing problems

Catch-share no catch-all solution to ocean's troubles: Law professor Rebecca Bratspies has an excellent, if acronym-heavy essay about how privatizing the seas through the use of "catch-shares," also known as individualized transferrable quotas (ITQs), is a troubling solution to the grave problem of...

U.S. fleet irresponsibly increases bigeye tuna catch in Pacific

U.S. bigeyes too big for sustainable plate: Although scientists are urging an immediate reduction in bigeye tuna catches to protect the species, and most nations are planning on reducing their bigeye catches by 10% per year, the U.S.-flagged fleet (which partly consists of recently re-flagged vessels from...

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