Currently Browsing: Grains

Growing with the grain: Review of “Homegrown Whole Grains”

As you may have guessed by now, I love to bake. And since part of my self-employment now entails baking goods to sell at Local Roots, I'm keenly interested both in sourcing what grains and flours I can find locally — as well as growing what I can. Thanks to the inspiration offered by Gene Logsdon in his...

Tracking the co-evolution of grass and humanity

High on grass: "We live in the age of grass," writes Olivia Judson, a research fellow in biology at Imperial College London, on the New York Times' Opinionator blog. Indeed, some of the crops that helped make humans an agricultural creature and create our complex civilization are grasses: wheat, rice, sugar...

Buckwheat and see: Growing my own grain

When it comes to my gardening, I tend to have a lot of big ideas and not nearly enough space in which to implement them. And the more I try to source my food locally, the more I want to try growing things myself to fill in the gaps of what I can't find at the local farmers market. Last fall, when I picked...

Asia could teach U.S. some new corn tricks

Thanks to fertile Midwestern plains, commodity-focused agricultural policy, a foreign policy that makes cheap petroleum a high priority, and an innovative agricultural industry, Americans are truly the 'people of the corn.' As the film "King Corn" and the book "The Omnivore's Dilemma" have well documented,...

Well worth the wheat: Gene Logsdon’s “Small-Scale Grain Raising”

As the price of flour and other grain-based foods has risen, creative-minded people have begun to consider growing their own wheat, corn, rye, and other grains. Groovy Green noted last year that one bakery — the Hungry Ghost Bread company in Northhampton, Massachusetts — even offered grain seeds to their...

Loafing in a cold climate

Winter weather has provided us with a never-ending topic of conversation lately: the storms pummeling the upper Midwest, the guesses as to how much those storms might repeat themselves here in northern Ohio, how to arrange our travels in the face of weather advisories, and, eventually, how much snow we...

Snapshot from Slow Food Nation: Native American plants in the Victory Garden

I had intended to do some "man in the garden" interviews while I hung around the Victory Garden watching the crowds come through. But my first set of victims were so interesting I talked to them for the entire half hour I had in between lectures. Maestra Macuilxochitl, Luz Alvarez-Martinez, and Carlos...

The Cereality show, coming to a college town near you!

This guest post is by Tracy Lerman, who likes to cook food from the Santa Cruz farmers market and ride her bike by the ocean. In her spare time Tracy works at the Organic Farming Research Foundation doing policy advocacy and organizing. Recently a new “restaurant” opened up where I live. This eating...

Digest – News: Scary wheat fungus spreading, food prices climbing, don’t blame the soda (right)

When it grains it pours: A dangerous new fungus with the ability to destroy entire wheat fields has been detected in Iran, says the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization. Up to 80% of all Asian and African wheat varieties are susceptible to the fungus, which can be transmitted across continents by wind....

Bread rises, and not just from yeast

Around the world there’s growing talk about food crisis as grain prices soar and supplies plummet. They’re talking food riots. And the American Bakers Association marched on Washington. Meanwhile, in the breadbasket of the nation (a.k.a. Kansas), the price of bread rose yesterday in its...

Bake on the wild side: Part 2, the bread

In part 1 of "Bake on the wild side," I wrote about how to create a sourdough starter and some of the science behind it. In this post I'll tell how I used the starter to make loaves of bread. There are many different ways to turn sourdough starter into bread: some easy, some complicated. My...

Exploring the pastabilities

I love pasta. There's just no getting around that simple fact. Others may avoid carbohydrates like the plague, but I find that a meal isn't quite complete without something a little starchy to hold everything together. An old-fashioned trencherwoman, that's me. And pasta ranks at the top of the list because...

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