Currently Browsing: Climate Change

The Marin Carbon Project studies carbon sequestration

Soil carbon sequestration — the process of converting gaseous carbon dioxide into carbon in the soil — offers a promising (and possibly necessary) route to addressing climate change because it could be a massive carbon sink. Indeed, a report by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change estimated that use of...

California’s tree crops are screwed, says new report

Things heat up in the nation's produce basket: Tree crops like apples, cherries, pears, walnuts and almonds rely on a chilly winter to set the stage for a productive spring and summer. But in a study released today, UC Davis scientists report that climate change is chipping away at the number of winter...

African farms getting hotter, need to start looking across borders for adapted seeds

Sounds like a great project for the Gates Foundation: African farmers are about to face growing seasons hotter than any in their experience. They can look to other regions that already have those hotter climates for ideas of how and what to grow: "A few lucky countries, such as Tanzania, Ethiopia and South...

Should agriculture count as a carbon offset?

"If a cow burps, how do you measure it?" (best NYT subhead ever): Debate over whether to include agriculture in the Waxman-Markey climate legislation is heating up between supporters of agricultural offsets, which fund projects like methane capture systems over CAFO animal-waste lagoons, and those who say...

Big Ag trying to hijack Waxman-Markey climate change bill

Time to eat your intellectual spinach: Cap-and-trade schemes are nobody's favorite beach reading, but Tom Philpott is valiantly, and cogently, tackling an important twist in the wrangling over the Waxman-Markey climate change bill. Some of the largest corporations in the agribusiness sector are trying to...

Considering a Green Bank

Greening the greenbacks: Reed Hundt, co-chair of the "Coalition for a Green Bank," writes about an interesting idea — a government-run, not-for-profit "Green Bank" that will help provide financing for projects that reduce the carbon intensity of our economy. If created by Congress, the bank's initial...

Tossing cowpies at today’s New York Times “Greening the Pasture” story

Right idea, wrong approach: We were so happy to see the New York Times piece, "Greening the Herd," about a Stonyfield Farm-backed program to change dairy cows' diets to see if it might reduce their methane emissions and thus curb their contribution to climate change. Especially this sentence: "Since...

Big Food vs. Mother Nature

Money can't buy you cheap oil again: FoE Tom Laskawy has a nice overview of Big Food's recent desperate-seeming lobbying efforts, before launching into how the one threat Big Food hasn't proven itself very adept at handling is "the multiheaded hydra of climate change, drought, and the shrinking supplies of...

Digest – News: Perilous pork, the First Lettuce, food safety plateaus

Free-range throwdown: A New York Times op-ed turns the food-fear spotlight on pastured pork, covering a study that finds that "free-range pork can be more likely than caged pork to carry dangerous bacteria and parasites" including potentially-deadly Trichinosis. The author gets in a few more digs with the...

Digest – Features and blogs: Free-range response, literary seasonality, the Hamburg wish list

Fighting the Averyian Flu: Researchers at Johns Hopkins University look a little deeper at the NYT pork op-ed and find that the study mentioned was funded by the National Pork Board, which represents conventional producers, and that the Trichinosis "positive" pigs tested seropositive, meaning they have the...

Digest – Features and blogs: Why go local?

Agriculture next to fall? In his latest blog screed, famed dystopian James Howard Kunstler predicts that agriculture will be the next to fall in the world economic crisis, noting that "if the US government is going to try to make remedial policy for anything, it better start with agriculture, to promote...

Digest – News & Features: Grass-fed emits more CO2 than grain-, wheat threatened, Grandin creates certification

Have you read (or written) something savory lately? Send your Digest tips to dig...@ethicurean.com. Grass-fed meat still linked to climate change: Grass-fed cattle have a higher carbon footprint than grain-fed, says Nathan Pelletier of Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia. Yes, you read that right. He says...

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