Currently Browsing: Seattle

Buyer beware this butcher’s bullshit

It's a sad and telling sign of the SOLE food movement's popularity, when people use the movement's principles to market their beef and hide the bullshit behind the counter.  As Matthew Richter writes in "Mystery Meat" for Seattle's The Stranger, J'Amy Owens and William Von Schneidau, the people behind Puget...

In “Fat of the Land,” forager Lang Cook tells how rooted food is to place

High school date nights found my boyfriend and I parked at the edge of Puget Sound, where daytime low tides enticed dozens of clam diggers to the tide flats. We called our sessions by the unintentionally indecent name "clam digging." High school was the last time I'd made out clamming until a recent outing...

Garage-top garden

Witchhazel is blooming at my house, a sign that spring is nearly here. I'm planning my garden, which will be my second one ever, if it comes to fruition. I started my first garden by reading piles of books. I spent the winter lingering over every kitchen garden book Amazon had to offer, littering my Sunset...

Go goat: Finding goat dairy products

Peek in our fridge and you'll find goat milk, goat butter, and a variety of goat cheeses -- my daughter is allergic to casein (one of milk's proteins) and I'm sensitive to lactose (its sugar). Goat milk, like cow milk, has both, but in a structure and an amount that makes it easier for our overly sensitive...

Guest post: Keeping goats in Seattle

Bonnie here: Jenni Pertuset, who's posted previously about the Crown S Ranch in Washington State, recently met a goat owner who could use some help from fellow Seattle residents. Read on to find out how a small urban farm is butting heads with city regulations. Jenni (pronounced like Jenna) lives in Seattle...

Catching up: Washington State locavoreanism

The Butter Bitch and I have been on hiatus for the past few months, due to our day jobs and ongoing projects. The Seattle Times' Pacific Northwest Sunday Magazine devotes most of this week's issue to an overview of Washington's locavorean movement and the promotion of sustainability in the wine. The Bounty...

Digest: Beef and sperm link, organic kiwis beat industrial, toxins everywhere

Male sterility and beef steroids: A new study says men whose moms ate a lot of beef during their pregnancy have a sperm count at 25% below normal. Possible suspects? Anabolic steroids used to fatten cattle in the U.S., or pesticides and other contaminants. Although the study is a little shaky, relying on...

Carbon neutrality – the holy grail

The idea of "carbon neutrality", or reducing one's carbon footprint, has been much in the news lately, what with Al Gore's Academy Award win for "An Inconvenient Truth" and subsequent reports related to the amount of energy his Tennessee home is reported to consume. While the Gores do have a fairly large...

Digest: Bacteria love, food bill of rights, more hogfarm lawsuits, Glassner revisited

Fiber — like armor for your gut: Thought there was nothing new to say about last year's E. coli outbreaks? Think again. This op-ed says the best defense against the bad bugs starts with your own stomach: eat more fiber, so your gut's bacteria can fight off invaders. Recommended are onions, leeks, garlic,...

“Best of the Puget Sound” list

Not to be outdone by a list of favorites from our old stomping grounds, we here in the Puget Sound region have our own list of fine foods to celebrate. With one exception, we had not encountered these treats before 2006. 1. Fish Brewing Company's Winterfish: This seasonal, organic beer from Olympia - well...

Butter in the raw

Until fairly recently, I reserved the same fear for raw milk as I did for rare hamburgers and pork chops--things that were as likely as not to kill me through the introduction of nasty parasites and bacteria into my digestive system.  But shortly after we started this blog, I realized that if I wanted to...

Winter lettuce in Seattle?

"Guess what I found at the farmers market?" the Butter Bitch announced last Sunday. "Lettuce!" Indeed she had, and she brought a head home as proof. The farmers cover the lettuce in the fields to protect their crop from the late autumn cold in the north. I'm surprised that the trick worked, but wasn't about...

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