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Shedding light on a per...
As small farmers look for ways to cut costs and increase their profit margins,...
Slow what?: Review of “...
By now, I’m sure that all good Ethicurean readers are familiar with Slow Food...
Bounty hunters: A revie...
As the local food movement expands and the numbers of small farms, CSA...
Getting plowed: Kristin...
The first time I heard of Essex Farm, I was working a kitchen/garden...
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“A beautiful bowl of...

International trade can wreak havoc on small farmers and the global food culture: impoverishing peasants, destroying old ways of cooking, and reducing biodiversity.  Now and then, however, international trade can have the opposite effect, building up farmers instead of rolling over them, preserving heritage foods instead of flooding the fields with a few varieties from big agribusiness. Rancho...

On the trademarking of ...

By Mat Rogers, Director of Agrariana Language and terminology are an integral part of the food movement. Making distinctions between agricultural practices deemed vile and reprehensible, in favor of methods moral and healthful, is a critical organizing tool for activists. Thus the good-food lexicon is immense — organic, biodynamic, no-spray, cage-free, free-range, heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO,...

Getting plowed: Kristin Ki...

The first time I heard of Essex Farm, I was working a kitchen/garden internship at the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont. The school sent me to the Northeast Organic Farming Association’s 2009 conference, where I carefully chose workshops I thought would help me plan and plant a garden that would serve the school’s kitchen. It was my first farm-y job, and it didn’t fit the usual...

Looking for Mr. Goodfish: ...

In the chapter on New York in Bottomfeeder: How to Eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood, Taras Grescoe comes down hard on the Big Apple’s elite chefs: Though the chefs I had met were buying from small businessmen who worked sustainably, their menus were still filled with overfished species….For every Bernardin and Esca, there were thousands of restaurants across the continent serving...

Jimmy Stewart, cults, and ...

By Michael Straus Pictures from opening night at Straus Family Creamery, February 4, 1994. (That’s me with the goatee.) Straus Family Creamery recently turned 17, and I started thinking back to those crazy times. In 1989, my older brother Albert, who’d been managing the farm and doing some pretty innovative things — including feeding our cows leftovers from a local sake factory … but that’s another...

Book review: Appreciating ...

Elizabeth Andoh is a prominent figure in my cooking consciousness. Her 2005 book, Washoku: Recipes from the Japanese Home Kitchen, opened a new frontier to me: the deceptively simple and elegant world of home-style Japanese cuisine. By following the recipes and techniques in Washoku, the food I cooked was often able to bring me to Japan – the aromas just right, the flavors true. So when I heard last...

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